LDN for Cancer

Cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the body. Cancer develops when the body’s normal control mechanism stops working. Old cells do not die and cells grow out of control, forming new, abnormal cells. These extra cells may form a mass of tissue, called a tumor. Some cancers, such as leukemia, do not form tumors. 

Low dose naltrexone might exert its effects on tumor growth through a mix of three possible mechanisms:

By inducing increases of metenkephalin (an endorphin produced in large amounts in the adrenal medulla) and beta endorphin in the blood stream; 
By inducing an increase in the number and density of opiate receptors on the tumor cell membranes, thereby making them more responsive to the growth-inhibiting effects of the already-present levels of endorphins, which induce apoptosis (cell death) in the cancer cells; and
By increasing the natural killer (NK) cell numbers and NK cell activity and lymphocyte activated CD8 numbers, which are quite responsive to increased levels of endorphins.1 (abstract)

Cancers that are reported by Dr. Bihari to apparently respond to LDN:

Malignant Melanoma
Multiple Myeloma
Neuroblastoma
Ovarian Cancer
Pancreatic Cancer
Prostate Cancer (untreated)
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Throat Cancer
Uterine Cancer

Bladder Cancer
Breast Cancer
Carcinoid
Colon & Rectal Cancer
Glioblastoma
Liver Cancer
Lung Cancer (Non-Small Cell)
Lymphocytic Leukemia (chronic)
Lymphoma (Hodgkin's and Non-Hodgkin's)